The Haunted Fort

Front Cover
Grosset & Dunlap, 1965 - Fiction - 176 pages
1 Review
A long-distance telephone call from Chet Morton's uncle summons Frank and Joe Hardy and their staunch pal Chet to a summer art school, located near old Fort Senandaga, which is reputed to be inhabited by a ghost. The young detectives' assignment: recover two famous oil paintings stolen from the valuable Prisoner-Painter collection owned by Jefferson Davenport. Mr. Davenport, millionaire sponsor of Millwood Art School, reveals that one of the famous Fort Senandaga pictures painted by his artist ancestor, General Jason Davenport, contains a clue to the hiding place of a priceless chain of gold. Vicious threats and deadly traps beset Frank, Joe, and Chet as they search for clues to the stolen paintings and the gold treasure, a search that is complicated by a stormy feud between a proud Englishman and an equally proud Frenchman over the military history of the ancient fort. - Flyleaf.

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Rude to the Callie and Iola, wrecking their summer plans--"The girls protested in vain." Only makes Hardys look like real jerks. Bad example. Want YOUR sister treated that way? Why couldn't sentence been, "The girls had activities to keep themselves agreeably occupied while the brothers were away, and they promised to return as soon as the case was over." 

Other editions - View all

About the author (1965)

Franklin W. Dixon Franklin W. Dixon is actually a pseudonym for any number of ghostwriters who have had the distinction of writing stories for the Hardy Boys series. The series was originally created by Edward Stratmeyer in 1926, the same mastermind of the Nancy Drew detective series, Tom Swift, the Rover Boys and other characters. While Stratmeyer created the outlines for the original series, it was Canadian writer Leslie McFarlane who breathed life to the stories and created the persona Franklin W. Dixon. McFarlane wrote for the series for over twenty years and is credited with success of the early collection of stories. As the series became more popular, it was pared down, the format changed and new ghostwriters added their own flavor to the stories. Part of the draw of the Hardy Boys is that as the authors changed, so to did the times and the story lines. While there is no one true author of the series, each ghostwriter can be given credit for enhancing the life of this series and never unveiling that there really is no Franklin W. Dixon.

Bibliographic information